Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Temple Univeristy's David Horowitz Freedom Center responds to the Muslim Students Association's calls for the cancellation of speech by Geert Wilders

Geert Wilders is perhaps one of the most prominent critics of radical Islam. The Temple DHFC invited him to speak on the dangers of 'Islamofascism', and were met, unsurprisingly by intense resistance from the MSA, who called on the University to cancel the event. This is the respsonse from the DHFC.

4 comments:

Ayush Soni said...

Did they just accuse a faculty member of supporting terrorism? They're throwing around some pretty serious accussations...

Lachlan said...

I think they're accusing the MSA of that. It's pretty well documented that MSA chapters have supported terrorist organizations in rhetoric, though I wouldn't go so far as to say they've had fundraisers for Hamas.

Evan said...

The reason "terrorist organizations" are not easy to fight against is because they also provide hospitals and schooling - Hamas, especially, is a sort of shadow government. So seeing Hamas as an organization that launches rockets into Israel is really no different than seeing Hamas as an organization that provides the only infrastructure Palestinians get. It's a matter of perspective, and seeing what you want to see. It's really both.

"Islamofascism" is silly, though, and we really need to move beyond seeing Islam as particular to this problem. "Radical Islam" bears no resemblance to actual Islam in any way other than the symbols it co-opts.

Lachlan said...

I absolutely agree. 'Islamofascism' is a fringe movement confined to the radical elements of the Muslim world. I don't agree with Wilders that Islam is inherently dangerous. People have used virtually every religion to justify violence, after all.

But Hamas, though it certainly provides services to the Palestinians, is solely responsible for the hardships endured by those people. Blockades on the Israel/Gaza and Egypt/Gaza borders would hardly be necessary if the constant influx of violent individuals and weapons were not an omnipresent threat to Israel. Hamas, through its violent acts and its indoctrination of Palestinian youth with genocidal views (see my previous post on Hamas-sponsored children's TV programming) is forcing Israel's heavy hand. If the latter did not feel that it is constantly threatened by a violent movement that openly seeks its destruction, the basic services Hamas provides its people would not be necessary, as Palestinians would receive those services from the Israeli state.